Yiyan Wang

Yiyan Wang
labex
pas Eurias

dates de séjour

02/11/2013 - 14/02/2014

discipline

Histoire moderne
Littérature

Fonction d’origine

Professeure

Institution d’origine

School of Languages and Cultures at Victoria University of Wellington (Nouvelle-Zélande)

pays d'origine

Nouvelle-Zélande

projet de recherche

Missing Narratives in Chinese History: Modernity and Writings on Art, 1900-1930

Until the 20th century there was no word for “art” or “fine art” in the Chinese language. The word, the concept, and the European practice of art arrived in China at the beginning of the 20th century. By the third decade, a total transformation of art concepts and practice had emerged. In 1929 China’s first national art exhibition, sponsored by the Ministry of Education, was held in Shanghai with overwhelming success. Leading contemporary intellectuals considered the art revolution an essential part of China’s trajectory towards modernity and actively participated in debate about art; but art historical events are still absent from the historiography of modern Chinese intellectual development. This project will produce the first book to document that intellectual debate over art, modernity and nation at the crucial historical junction between the last years of imperial China and the beginning decades of the Republican era (1900-1930). The resulting analysis will provide a new understanding of China’s unfolding intellectual modernity and, in particular, its correlation with colonialism and cultural nationalism.

biographie

Dr Wang Yiyan is Professor of Chinese and Director of the Chinese Programme at the School of Languages and Cultures at Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand. Her publications focus on modern Chinese literature and culture. She is the author of Narrating China: Jia Pingwa and His Fictional World (Routlege 2006, 2012). She is currently engaged in two research projects: a. “Missing Narratives in Chinese History: Modernity and Writings on Art, 1900-1930”; b. “Local Stories and National Identity: Competing National Narratives in Contemporary Chinese Nativist Fiction”.

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